(Re)generate: (find-eev-exercises-intro)
Source code:  (find-efunction 'find-eev-exercises-intro)
More intros:  (find-eev-quick-intro)
              (find-here-links-intro)
              (find-refining-intro)
              (find-escripts-intro)
              (find-eev-intro)
              (find-eepitch-intro)
This buffer is _temporary_ and _editable_.
It is meant as both a tutorial and a sandbox.
The quickest way to open or recreate this is with `M-x ex',
but you will need to run this:
  (defun ex () (interactive) (find-eev-exercises-intro))




This is part of the material the I prepared for this workshop:
  http://angg.twu.net/2021-workshop.html
The rest was moved to:
  (find-saving-links-intro)




0. Prerequisites

I will suppose: a. that you have Emacs 27 or 28 (pretest) installed, b. that you have watched the "installation and navigation" video and tried everything on it. Two points are especially important: first, you should start eev with M-x eev-beginner until you are no longer a beginner - `M-x eev-beginner' makes sure that all modules of eev were loaded. Second, `M-j' will be very important. The video explains it at: (find-eevnavvideo "6:28" "M-j: you can forget practically everything...") (find-eevnavvideo "6:41" "if you type just M-j") (find-eevnavvideo "6:48" "has a header that is beginner-friendly") The beginner-friendly header generated by `M-j' has changed since I recorded that video, and now it shows these three ways of opening the file where we will put our notes instead of showing just the first one: M-1 M-j runs: (find-fline "~/TODO") M-2 M-1 M-j shows the file ~/TODO in the right window M-3 M-1 M-j opens ~/TODO in the right window I will suppose that you have tried `M-21j' and `M-31j' and that you understood what they do. c. I will also suppose that you are running Emacs "in a way in which the standard keys should work". For example, Doom Emacs redefines many keys, including M-1, M-2, etc, that we will use a lot, so Doom Emacs is "bad". I have the impression that all the modes that make Emacs use vi-like keybindings also interfere with keys that we will use, so they're "bad" too. Besides that some window managers capture keys combinations like Alt-Shift-<letter>, so they're "bad"; if you use a window manager like that please install another one that captures few keys and learn how switch between your favorite ("bad") WM and the one that you will use in the workshop. Also, one person that attended the workshop that I gave in november was trying to use Emacs in a terminal on a Raspberry Pi 0... she said that many things didn't work but gave few details, so I'll considered that _for the purposes of this workshop_ terminal Emacs is "bad" and GUI Emacs is "good". d. In some parts of the workshop I will suppose that people can switch between an Emacs window and a browser window; in particular, I will suppose that they can follow links to videos, and for beginners this is much easier to do on a browser. For example, you can "follow" the link (find-eev2020video "2:53" "pos-spec-lists") using a browser by opening the HTMLized version of this intro using this URL, http://angg.twu.net/eev-intros/find-eev-exercises-intro.html locating the link to the video there, and clicking on the link in its timestamp. e. I will _sort of_ suppose that the people on the workshop have read these sections of two basic tutorials and have tried to do the exercises in them: (find-eev-quick-intro) (find-eev-quick-intro "1. Installing eev") (find-eev-quick-intro "2. Evaluating Lisp") (find-eev-quick-intro "3. Elisp hyperlinks") (find-eev-quick-intro "4. Creating Elisp Hyperlinks") (find-eev-quick-intro "4.1. `find-here-links'") (find-eev-quick-intro "4.2. `find-ekey-links' and friends") (find-eev-quick-intro "5. Links to Emacs documentation") (find-eev-quick-intro "5.1. Navigating the Emacs manuals") (find-eev-quick-intro "5.2. Cutting and pasting") (find-windows-beginner-intro) (find-windows-beginner-intro "1. Download and install Emacs") (find-windows-beginner-intro "2. Key sequences and how to quit") (find-windows-beginner-intro "3. Using M-x and installing eev") (find-windows-beginner-intro "4. Understanding buffers and the mode line") (find-refining-intro) (find-refining-intro "1. Pos-spec-lists") The prerequisites are just the ones above. The previous workshop that I gave required installing external programs, but this one will not be like that. For more info on that previous workshop, see: http://angg.twu.net/2021-workshop.html#november